argument essay format

argument essay format

Argument essay format
There are four basic sections of any argumentative essay you should follow:
Without a good evidence, no one is going to believe my words.

Argument essay format
Conducting research includes several steps:

  • Does your thesis include a statement that anybody could argue for or against?
  • Are all your arguments clearly worded and coherent?
  • Did you use the best examples to support your arguments?
  • Have you managed to successfully present and refute any counterargument(s)?
  • Does the conclusion give an interesting look into the future of this topic?
  • State your thesis in a sentence or two, then write another sentence saying why it’s important to make that claim. Indicate, in other words, what a reader might learn by exploring the claim with you. Here you’re anticipating your answer to the “why” question that you’ll eventually flesh out in your conclusion.
  • Begin your next sentence like this: “To be convinced by my claim, the first thing a reader needs to know is . . .” Then say why that’s the first thing a reader needs to know, and name one or two items of evidence you think will make the case. This will start you off on answering the “what” question. (Alternately, you may find that the first thing your reader needs to know is some background information.)
  • Begin each of the following sentences like this: “The next thing my reader needs to know is . . .” Once again, say why, and name some evidence. Continue until you’ve mapped out your essay.

Writing an academic essay means fashioning a coherent set of ideas into an argument. Because essays are essentially linear—they offer one idea at a time—they must present their ideas in the order that makes most sense to a reader. Successfully structuring an essay means attending to a reader’s logic.

Argument essay format
Argumentative essays can be organized in many different ways, but one common format for persuasive writing is the five paragraph essay, which includes an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. In the introduction, which is the first paragraph of the essay, Myrtle will want to explain the issue and state her position. For example, she’ll mention that staying out late is an issue that is important to many people. She’ll state that she believes that her curfew should be later.
If all Myrtle includes in her essay is her position, reasons, and evidence, she could make a pretty convincing case. But the best essays also include counterarguments, sometimes shortened to counters, which are reasons why the other side’s arguments are not correct. For example, let’s say that one thing that Myrtle’s parents say to her consistently is that teenagers need sleep. She knows this is one reason why her parents don’t want to extend her curfew. In her essay, she can address this and provide a counter. For example, she could write something like, ‘You believe that extending my curfew will mean I get less sleep. But I stay up late already, and just because I’m home early doesn’t mean that I’ll go to bed early.’

Argument essay format
Topics for this type of essay can vary a lot, as any subject can use this format. As a rule though, they can often be hot button topics. For example, they could include abortion, border control issues, and the death penalty.

  • ‘Should marijuana be legalized in the UK?’
  • ‘Do children suffer if they only have one parent?’
  • ‘Are all charities equally deserving?’

Refences:

http://essaypro.com/blog/argumentative-essay
http://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/essay-structure
http://study.com/academy/lesson/argumentative-essay-definition-format-examples.html
http://boomessays.com/blog/how-write-argumentative-essay
http://www.victordematha.com/help-me-write-an-mla-format-narrative-essay-simple-tips/

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